Euro Cult Movie Forum => Books & Magazines => Topic started by: Stephen Grimes on 11 Jul 2007 - 11:45

Title: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 11 Jul 2007 - 11:45
What's everyones favorite Eurocult books and magazines?
Bloodbuster's 220 page Italian crime review book CINICI INFAMI E VIOLENTI is amazing and has yet to be beaten,Italian language only but an essential reference guide.
CINE 70 is also Italian language but is filled with reviews of the most obscure Italian b-movies from the 70's and some great interviews and posterart,currently on #10 which features an Agostina Belli(Revolver,Night of the Devils etc)interview.
There's also the Midnight Media publications including their regular review guide IS IT UNCUT and their specials like BLAZING MAGNUMS and the GIALLO SCRAPBOOK,great.

(http://img170.imageshack.us/img170/2700/cine7001roh4.jpg) (http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/149/blazingmagnums1coverah0.gif) (http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/5548/cinicioh7.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 11 Jul 2007 - 11:49
In addition to the ones you've already mentioned I also recommend Adrian Luther-Smiths essential Giallo reference guide 'Blood & Black Lace'.

(http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/9051/bloodae0.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Gary B. on 11 Jul 2007 - 16:47
I'll add IMMORAL TALES.  It covers in great detail the films and background of Jess Franco and Jean Rollin among others, and has turned me on to a number of great films.
(http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/2352/tohillzu0.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: mrb on 11 Jul 2007 - 16:52
That's the third cover i've seen for that book, it must sell okay. I've got the first issue with the red border.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Mart85 on 11 Jul 2007 - 16:54
The Glittering Images Western 'All Italiana books are essential.  Full of poster art, lobby cards and contains reviews and plot summaries for each film covered.  Really great stuff.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: vigilanteforce on 11 Jul 2007 - 17:19
I second Johny's recommendation of the Blood & Black Lace book- its an essential and probably the greatest Euro Cult book ever published IMO.

there are a few more though:

(http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/1133/eatenalivebksk9.jpg)

My friend Jay has written this book about Italian cannibal & zombie films. Features reviews for every film, some rare poster artwork and its very informative. Also features titles that don't belong in these two genres but have such elements.

Amazon LINK (http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/085965379X/ref=nosim?tag=lovelockandlo-21)

(http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/8104/spagnightmaressh3.jpg)

This one is highly recommended as well. I don't agree with many of its reviews as the guy trashes even films such as TENEBRE, but overall, the book has some great interviews with maestros such as Argento, Fulci, Margheriti, Lenzi and lots more!

Amazon LINK (http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0963498274/ref=nosim?tag=lovelockandlo-21)

Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 11 Jul 2007 - 19:11
I have the SPAGHETTI NIGHTMARES and the EATEN ALIVE! books as well as three of the DARK SIDE books. I have the BEYOND TERROR book, an excellent work on the films of Lucio Fulci, ITALIAN HORROR from Midnight Marquee and the recent BOOK OF THE DEAD from Fab Press.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: vigilanteforce on 11 Jul 2007 - 19:22
These 2 Dario Argento books on FabPress are essential as well!

(http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/102/artlq0.jpg)
(http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/9088/argentolibro000vz5.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 11 Jul 2007 - 19:49
Also I have the FLESH & BLOOD COMPENDIUM from Fab Press covers Euro stuff as well. Did anyone happen to get that massive tome GODS IN POLYESTER: A TRIP THROUGH 70s CINEMA OBSCURA? I may have the subtitle off a bit but I anxiously awaited this books release and tried to order it from a local Borders store. I assumed it hadn't come out yet. The next time I saw something about it, it was out of print!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: vigilanteforce on 11 Jul 2007 - 23:28
I missed this one and really need a copy..... Looks like a must-own. Can anybody comment on it? Perhaps somebody here would like to sell their copy?

(http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/1083/57865012zh2.jpg)

Does it focus only on CH or covers his whole filmography?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 12 Jul 2007 - 03:29
It covers his whole filmography. I wouldn't say it's up to the standard of their later books either.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jay on 12 Jul 2007 - 11:24
Glad you liked Eaten Alive! Now working on book two which is going to be a monster in scale and depth.

Thanks for nice words, guys.


Lefteris: you sure you can't be tempted with Cin cin... cianuro?  :-X
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 12 Jul 2007 - 18:54
Welcome back Jay,any chance of more stuff on Polselli and Cavallone soon?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jay on 12 Jul 2007 - 21:06
Hello mate!

Sure thing! Cavallone retro was in the last The Dark Side.

LOVED doing that.

LOVED it.

Jay
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 12 Jul 2007 - 21:07

Sure thing! Cavallone retro was in the last The Dark Side.

Thanks mate,i'll have to grab a copy when i'm home in London next month.
Title: Alberto Cavallone Part One
Post by: Jay on 13 Jul 2007 - 06:50
The Perverse, Deranged Movies and Lost Movies of an Italian Wildcard
A retrospective on Alberto Cavallone by Jay Slater


“They were chopping off their bollocks with their own hands.”
Alberto Cavallone on the Italian censor

The unique cinema of Alberto Cavallone was forged from the turbulent times during the mid-Seventies when Italy was subjected to political chaos, scandal and upheaval, terrorism and murder, rising street crime and a nation’s sense of fear and anxiety. Known as “Anni di Piombo”, or the Leaden Years, Italian film began to reflect the country’s mood for revolutionary cinema – notably after the decline of the spaghetti western – where the bourgeoisie were learning of the younger generation’s extreme viewpoints and political ambitions. There was a need for change and genre cinema, being the most commercial, flourished in that it reflected what the public demanded to see. The Italian “poliziotteschi” crime movie, those featuring the likes of Franco Nero and Maurizio Merli, who blew away politicians, gangs and murderers who escaped the corrupt justice system with their .38 Specials snowballed into a highly lucrative genre that fuelled the public’s desire to see the everyman wipe away scum and to liberate the streets, some movies interestingly predating Michael Winner’s Death Wish (1974). 

Also, sex became a phenomenon in magazines and comic strips that predictably infiltrated the Italian film industry. Softcore comedies, often starring curvaceous beauties such as Edwich Fenech and Gloria Guida, became highly popular for home consumption although a number sold overseas. In turn, these “slap and tickle” titillation movies influenced genre directors such as Aristide Massacessi (aka “Joe D’Amato”) to lens their own soft pictures that led to hardcore which proved to be financially beneficial for the international market. Porn and exploitation was an obvious crossover and the brief run of the Italian Nazi movie included hardcore inserts for various territories such as Cesare Canevari’s L’ultima orgia del III Reich/Gestapo’s Last Orgy (1977). Pier Paolo Pasolini’s final film after his “Trilogy of Life” series was Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma/Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), that although shocked audiences for its graphic portrayal of violence, sexual degradation and torture, influenced independent Italian filmmakers into producing their own cannon of colourful and fetishist cinema, however severe and unsuitable for public consumption by the authorities. Alberto Cavallone, like Polselli – both well-read and intellectual men – were able to voice their art house narrative on politics and social context behind a veil of sensationalistic cinema with a punch. During the Seventies, Italian genre independent film was to spiral to new depths of depravity and high creativity, stunning audience-goers and infuriating the censor.

Little is known of Alberto Cavallone and his movies: some being lost or damaged, and his unorthodox working methods, eccentric and anarchic film style, as well as the majority of his films never being released outside Italy, saw that his genius was to be curtailed by the home censor and limited distribution. Unlike Polselli and Jesus Franco, Cavallone was never to achieve the recognition as an auteur with his own sense of cinéma vérité. Like his protagonists, Cavallone’s films were to go further in the extreme, portraying women in peril or sex objects as a one fingered salute towards authority whilst appeasing the adult crowd: suffice to say, his last movies were to be hardcore porn, and Blue Movie (1978) being Cavallone’s Rubicon. 

After honing his craft on a number of commercials, Cavallone’s first film was La sporca guerra/The Dirty War which was shot between 1959 and 1960. Aged seventeen (his grandmother lying to his parents stating that he was away with friends so he could make his film), Cavallone shot the movie on 16mm and was based on the Algerian War of Independence when the country was rocked by civil war from 1954 to 1962. The young and intrepid filmmaker shot risqué footage of combat and explosions before moving to Paris in 1958 to lens terrorist activity, notably in Billancourt where he filmed three people who had just been hanged. Controversy – to be Cavallone’s thumbprint – hit the fifty minute film on its immediate release when Italian communists were outraged by its political content and demanded alterations to be made: Cavallone refused. La sporca guerra, its only remaining print believed to be stored in Milan, also features one of Pino Donaggio’s first scores.

Lontano dagli occhi/Far from the Eyes (1962) was a pseudo-documentary shot in Frankfurt which was one of the first movies to chronicle a trial against Nazis who it was alleged committed acts against humanity such as the horrors of the concentration camps and the use of Zyclone B in the gas chambers. Shot on a shoestring (Cavallone and crew took turns to drive when others slept on their trip to Germany), the film never received distribution where the negatives that were stored in Milan were lost in the sands of time. In the mid-Sixties after earning a crust making commercials, he was tempted to pack his bags for Rome by maverick producer Franco Cristaldi where he would get his foot in the door in the film industry by writing screenplays as Ennio De Concini’s assistant; Concini had penned such works as Mario Bava’s La Maschera del demonio/Black Sunday (1960), Lucio Fulci’s I Quattro dell’apocalisse/Four Gunmen of the Apocalypse (1975), Tinto Brass’s Salon Kitty (1976) and Roberto Faenza’s Copkiller/Order of Death (1983).

Cavallone was then permitted to write under his own name for Dino Risi’s L’Ombrellone/Weekend, Italian Style (1966), Duccio Tessari’s Per amore… per magia…/For Love… for Magic (1967) and Mikhail Kalatozov’s Krasnaya Palatka/The Red Tent (1969) before working fulltime on his own movie, Le Salamandre/The Salamander in 1969. Inspired by the writings of writer Fritz Fanon who believed that a colonial population could only reach freedom by declaring violence towards their occupiers, Cavallone’s tale sees a white photographer (Erna Schurer) who seduces a black model (the lovely ebony Beryl Cunningham). A doctor arrives on the scene – Anthony Vernon (Antonio Casale) who took his pseudo from Jesus Franco stalwart Howard Vernon – and Schurer falls for his charms. Outraged, Cunningham kills the photographer and the doctor. Le Salamandre received a critical drubbing in Italy although it was a hit at the box-office where it cost around nine thousand pounds to make and scooped a staggering four hundred and twenty-four thousand in return; in an age when a cinema ticket cost fifty pence. As his first commercial movie, Cavallone believed its success to be a disgrace stating, “The first movie must be unsuccessful. Only this can make the second a more successful movie!”

Cavallone achieved another homegrown hit with Dal nostro inviato a Copenhagen/From Our Copenhagen’s Correspondent in 1970 where two American soldiers fresh from the Vietnam War are haunted by the atrocities that they witnessed and committed while on a vacation in Copenhagen, Denmark. Based on true events where a number of American soldiers were granted two to three months in Wiesbaden, Germany, to purge the violence they had inside, done or had suffered as a consequence of their actions, Dal nostro inviato a Copenhagen is lazy filmmaking from a technical point-of-view as if Cavallone discovered the zoom on the first day (something that he had admitted). Dull and unengaging, it’s a film where nothing really happens despite the presence of Cavallone’s stunning waif-like wife Jane Avril (Maria Pia Luzi) who he would later divorce. Interestingly, in a method he would use later with some his more controversial pictures, Cavallone intercuts his film with disturbing documentary footage from the Vietnam conflict of burning villages and mutilated corpses, with bizarrely staged action set in rural Italy to compliment its Asian backdrop, as would Antonio Margheriti implement in the Philippines with L’ultimo cacciatore/The Last Hunter (1980), Fuga dall’archipelago maledetto/Tiger Joe (1982) and Tornado (1983). “Dal nostro inviato a Copenhagen… Horrible title, absolutely shit,” Cavallone had accused his producers of changing its original title from Così U.S.A (So U.S.A. but also reads as “That’s the way it goes”) as they had felt that it was too strong considering the My Lai Massacre. The en masse slaughter of Vietnamese civilians by US troops, mostly women and children, on 16 March 1968 prompted widespread outrage, and the producers got cold feet realising that Cavallone’s bloody and unflinching finale predated the bloodbath: so much so, they demanded to cut the movie. Cavallone believed that the producers wanted to filter his antiwar message and political ambitions in a crude and direct way, as the director called it, a new “dirty war.” In typical Cavallone flourish and disregard for sensibilities, “They were chopping off their bollocks with their own hands!” An obscure film that received a limited domestic homevideo release, not much is known of the materials or cast such as Alain N Kalsjy (Walter Fabrizio), who after completing the shoot, it was believed left for India to buy and sell local craftwork.

A year later, Cavallone returned with his best-looking movie: Quickly, spari e baci a colazione/Quickly, Shootings and Kisses for Breakfast, a bizarre and surreal slapstick action movie with Terry Gilliam inspired animations (by Cavallone himself) spliced throughout the movie with no regard for comprehension. A diamond heist with colourful characters and crisp cinematography, the humour is best described as unsophisticated Terence Hill and Bud Spencer larks complemented by crude animation, a bright and jazzy score by Cavallone regular composer Franco Potenza and a bevy of stunning women: Maria Pia Luzi, Beryl Cunningham, Magda Konopka and Claudie Lange – what’s not to like in a commercial movie with experimental qualities? With Zelda (1974), Cavallone described Quickly, spari e baci a colazione as a “mercenary movie”, or in other words, “messed up, because it couldn’t be otherwise than that way,” with monies attributed from Italy, Morocco and Tunisia.

Cavallone returned in 1973 with Afrika, a violent examination of male homosexuality in a time when it was considered taboo where Ivano Staccioli and his lover engage in a self-destructive relationship against the background of Africa. Typically Cavallone, the film starts with a naked white woman who is tortured by having a lit cigarette extinguished on one of her breasts by a black soldier, who is then shot in the vagina by machine gun fire. A male protagonist is raped in unflinching and uncomfortable detail and the film is graced with much in the way of female nudity – if it wasn’t for the director’s claims that he had made a social document on homosexuality, Afrika could have been rubber-stamped as an exploitation film, which it is. Cavallone claimed he made a major mistake by casting Staccioli for lead – who would later appear as Gestapo kingpin in Bruno Mattei’s KZ9 – Lager di sterminio/Women’s Camp 119 (1977) – as he did not realise that the actor was homosexual before shooting commenced. The outspoken artist claimed that he would have chosen someone else as, “an actor can’t play himself, unless he’s at [Dirk] Bogarde’s level,” was “a bit above the line,” and to nail his colours firmly on the mast: “he wasn’t good enough, anyway.” Filmed mainly in Ethiopia, the production was plagued by incidents as the country was going through a turbulent change of regime. Witnessing cruel atrocities around them, Cavallone and crew were arrested for ten days and constantly paid unpleasant visits by the police and army. Indeed, during a scene where a boy is kidnapped in a town square, Cavallone was thrown into a cell for two days where his interrogators who once spoke in Italian, refused to converse with him unless it was in their native tongue – the Italian eyeing edgy guards sporting machine guns and tools of torture, never knew if would face the firing squad. Understandably, Cavallone hated everything about Afrika due to what happened on the shoot, which was just as well as it flopped at the box-office; the public hated it. Most prints have been lost but a scratchy 8mm version is in circulation that has lost much of its colour and is missing twenty minutes of footage from the eighty-five minute theatrical release.

Cavallone was finding it more and more difficult to paint on his own canvas – his surreal vision and thought, experimental approach to filmmaking and gratuitous imagery were becoming verboten for commercial acceptance. Zelda (1974) was to be Cavallone’s last film where he compromised with producers and distributors to make a marketable picture before going solo and painting the town red with his own ventures such as Blue Movie and Spell (1977). Focusing on female homosexuality, Zelda was not of interest to Cavallone because he believed that the film never took risks despite prints being seized by Italian police for twenty days for obscenity charges featuring Turinese actress Franca Gonella – who also revealed all in Polselli’s Rivelazioni di uno psichiatra sul mondo perverso del sesso/Revelations of a Psychiatrist on the Perverse World of Sex (1973) – in a scene where she had sex on her father’s grave.

Spell was to mark an eclectic medley of surrealistic images, sexual energy, angst and wrath that Cavallone would consummate with distinction, if that is an acceptable accolade, a year later with Blue Movie. Chronicling the working lives within a small Italian town, the film follows a number of characters – most sexual frustrated within the boundaries of their mundane and predictable existences – that eventually explode in fury and lust at the local carnival. Cavallone’s inspiration for Spell came from when he became disillusioned of Rome and lived in a remote town for five years and realised that the carnival, or other local festivities of the type, were a welcome pressure valve for the locals where everything could be out in the open without fear of reprisal or embarrassment. Spell was attacked by its critics, one claiming that Cavallone was not a director, but the material for a mental institute. It’s understandable to see why art house intelligentsia despised such a movie where the working class and surrealism inspired by the works of Georges Bataille clashed, but Spell was more welcome in the southern provinces where people could identify with the non-actors and their lives despite the heavy-handed political and fantastic imagery on offer (the Italian western was also popular in the south for such reasons, the cities less so).

Spell is a simplistic tale, electrically charged by composer Claudio Tallino’s score and shocking scenes of astonishing realism that shatter the placid beauty of the sun-bathed town, cobbled streets and simplistic lifestyle. Although Cavallone’s brush paints an obvious canvas of life and death, such as gravediggers exhuming a coffin to eat hardboiled eggs, or a butcher lusting over teenager girls and thrusting himself into a side of cow, the violent spectacle stands out, notably a stranger who is defecated upon (maize porridge and chocolate, claimed the director) before being stabbed between the legs. Macha Magall, a German actress who starred in Luigi Batzella’s video nasty La Bestia in calore/The Beast in Heat the same year before achieving success in the theatre, had an opportunity to act as a frustrated wife as well as being prematurely aged. Mónica Zanchi, who was to appear in two other movies in 1977, Giuseppe Vari’s Suor Emanuelle/Sister Emanuelle and Aristide Massaccesi’s Emanuelle e gli ultima canniabli/Emanuelle and the Last Cannibals, was to be Cavallone’s whipping girl. In one scene, a chicken is killed on camera in front of Zanchi which repulsed her. Two days later, Cavallone asked her to partake in a scene where she was to lie on a pool table where a butcher would shoot balls between her open legs. Needless to say that Zanchi was furious, but despite her tantrums, the scene was shot.     

I
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jay on 13 Jul 2007 - 06:51
 

In the same year, Cavallone wanted to do something different to Spell, and after reading the poems from Maldoror by Lautréamont (1868), was inspired to write a screenplay based upon his writings. A tragic love story of acceptance and denial, the film tells of a movie director (spaghetti western regular Gianni Garko) who commits suicide after being snubbed by American photographer Sherry Buchanan after a series of hallucinogenic dreamlike set-pieces fuelled by drug use. Incorrectly reported as an unfinished film, it was completed and screened twice for distributors but failed to gain a theatrical release, possibly due to complex issues regarding finances with its producers and location and condition of the remaining negative is unclear. Cavallone remembered delightful anecdotes from the movie such as Garko being a “madman” but a seriously professional character actor (in one scene, his character suffers from a limp, so Garko screwed a ball of paper in to the heel of his shoe, that that when worn, he would suffer from a large painful blister) and considered Maldoror to be one of his best roles. Production was halted for over six hours when police stopped the shoot to investigate a prop – a car with a coffin strapped to its roof – because only an authentic mortician’s car is allowed to do so, and an American actress, who was stapled inside the gut of a real cow. The animal was killed, skinned and its belly opened, where in the movie, the naked actress would spring forth from within the carcass (a reference to Fernando Arrabal’s Viva la muerte (1971), a favourite director of Cavallone, and interestingly a very similar scene is featured in Gianfranco Mingozzi’s Flavia, la monaca musulmana/Flavia the Heretic (1974)). Naturally the poor girl was less than pleased to commit herself to be sewn within the belly of a freshly killed cow. The scene took half a day to film with the actress sealed within the cow for the majority of the shoot. Once completed, the actress was delirious, having visions and behaving like a drunk, apparently subjected to blood intoxication from within the cow’s innards.

Whereas Spell had alienated the mainstream, Cavallone went for jugular with Blue Movie, pushing boundaries that were for most, unacceptable cinema where the director appeared to be in anguish and out of control: absurd in that the extreme content matter was a catharsis for the moral, political and intellectual tapestry. Whereas Salò o le 120 giornate di Sodoma was possibly as far as Pasolini dared go in terms of graphic content, Blue Movie could be considered Cavallone’s suicide and blunt force trauma in that he had extinguished all avenues of interest to make a commercial film. Shot and edited in twenty days and featuring unprofessional actors (except that of Dirce Funari who would later appear in Aristide Massaccesi’s hardcore horrors Le Notti erotiche dei morti viventi/Erotic Nights of the Living Dead (1980), Holocausto porno/Porno Holocaust (1981) and Cesare Canevari’s Delitto carnale (1983), a giallo released in two versions: contemporary thriller and hardcore), the director’s inclinations are clear. The title takes its cue from Andy Warhol’s Blue Movie/Fuck (1969) whereas major elements of the film are taken from Dusan Makavejev’s Sweet Movie (1974) and Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom (1960). A male fashion photographer, haunted by the horrors of the Vietnam War, subjects a willing model (Funari) to humiliating sexual acts and to become his slave, whereas he meets a beautiful girl (Danielle Dugas) who suffers from sexual anxiety and hallucinations of being raped. The three protagonists’ lives retreat to that of solitude, away from society and consumerism, before imploding in violence.

The narrative is non-linear and almost nonexistent, the movie fuelled by surreal and excruciating imagery, threatening to eclipse the barbarism towards women as seen in Italian shockers Fernando Di Leo’s Avere vent'anni/To Be Twenty (1978), Mario Landi’s Giallo a Venezia (1979) and Camillo Teti’s L’Assassino è ancora tra noi/The Murderer Is Still with Us (1986). Cavallone’s inspiration from Makavejev’s cult movie is obvious: whereas Sweet Movie cuts to images of the Katyn Forest massacre, Cavallone uses grainy stock footage of Nazi death camps with bodies piled high and some consumed by fire. Also, in Sweet Movie, Carol Laure smothers her body in chocolate: here Dirce Funari does the same but with her own excrement. Blue Movie is certainly controversial and there is more to the film than a work of titillation, degradation and a question of a misogynistic hatred towards women graced with an art house classical score by Bach. Cavallone composes an eclectic series of surreal imagery, some based on consumerism where Coca-Cola cans and Marlboro cigarette packets are filled with urine and faeces, and sexually charged dreams. With regards to the latter, Dugas pours a bath that floods with blood. A male arm rises from the depths and grabs her, the camera focusing on her nether region which is adorned by a tattoo of a spider, the vagina being the arachnid seeping blood from its mouth: the vagina. The scene is intercut with brief hardcore and clips of real human atrocities – we’re in seriously deranged Polanski country. The Italian board of censors asked for a number of cuts but they did not ask for a complete ban, possibly preferring to ignore Cavallone’s monstrosity than to acknowledge its existence. Regardless of censorship cuts, Blue Movie is a work of passion and fury by a filmmaker saluting one finger of resistance to authority although it was to be the abreaction of his own self-destruction as an artist. Cavallone was to never reach the dramatic and dangerous heights of Blue Movie and was the swansong of violent Italian independent cinema which two decades on, still upsets the majority who see the film; it comes to no surprise that actress Funari left the set feeling disgusted. Much to the surprise of Cavallone whose main aim was to “piss off the sexy movie fans”, Blue Movie was a success at the Italian box office.

In 1980, Cavallone directed Blow job dolce lingua: a misleading title considering the film’s narrative. Originally shot in the summer of ’79 and released in May ’80 under the title of La Strega nuda (The Naked Witch), it tells of a young man (Danilo Micheli) who is tempted to a weird house by an ugly witch (Anna Massarelli) where he encounters a group of surreal characters in surreal circumstances. More a film of images and sensations than a cohesive storyline – including arresting shots such as the witch mutating from ugly to beautiful while circling Micheli, and the lead character foreseeing his own funeral escorted by bikers - Blow job dolce lingua is yet another Cavallone movie in censorship limbo after the authorities put a stop to an uncut release: it’s only hard scene being a scene of fellatio set in a storm (producer Pietro Belpedio claimed that hardcore shots were filmed and Cavallone had been spicing his films with hardcore scenes for the French market since Zelda). The director preferred to use non-actors for the movie, more interested in faces than acting ability, even if they were as expressive as a piece of wood. “I use different camera angles,” Cavallone admitted, “making it an editor’s problem.”

Le gemella erotica/Erotic Twin (1981) is a pedestrian softcore thriller that goes nowhere fast. A film that Cavallone hated with a passion – in fact, he claimed to have dropped the movie halfway through shooting – it tells of two female twins: one a saint, the other a whore with disastrous consequences. Some inside sources claim that Cavallone was replaced by Luigi Cozzi who was left to complete the picture which is highly doubtful considering that Cavallone edited the completed film! Cavallone, like Jesus Franco, would bend truths and lies when it suited him best: in fact, he had been shooting and inserting hardcore footage into his latter movies and it was reported that Cozzi met the director in the mid-Eighties working on the Italian dubbing on a number of foreign hardcore porn films.     

1982 saw Cavallone drop his artistic vision, social commentary and bludgeoning depravity for hardcore porn under his “Baron Corvo” pseudo which was a reference to writer Frederick William Rolfe (1860 – 1913). Shot back-to-back between June and September 1981 (initially it was planned to shoot one movie) Pat una donna particolare/Pat, One Particular Woman and Il nano erotico/Babysitter are typical of cheap Italian pornography of the period, such as Polselli and Bruno Vari’s Teresa altri desideri (1983) and Dyane (1984), with grainy film and ugly performers. The first focuses on a plot where theatrical plays are a thin veil for unpleasant hardcore and a dubious thread on snuff filmmaking whereas the latter, which is practically unheard of and is not listed on the IMDB, makes no sense whatsoever. Both films were shot in a villa near Rome which was also used a year previously by Aristide Massaccesi for Rosso sangue/Absurd and Pat una donna particolare also features Italian language dubbing by ADR dubber John Gayford who would probably not want to be reminded of his shady past. The dwarf, “Petit Loup” (“Little Wolf” in French, but real name is unknown) appears in both films appearing to have the time of his life as well as being a regular in Italian sexploitation having appeared in Bruno Mattei’s Emanuelle e le porno notti nel mondo n.2/Emanuelle and the Erotic Nights (1978).

In 1983, after the success of Jean-Jacques Annaud’s La Guerre du feu/Quest for Fire (1981) and the rising popularity of sword and sorcery, Cavallone lent his hand on a screenplay for Umberto Lenzi’s La Guerra del ferro – Ironmaster/Ironmaster, and his final theatrical movie, Il Padrone del mondo/Master of the World. The former is a ridiculous piece of schlock where cavemen do what cavemen do best: grunt and thump bones by a fire. Primitive clans are attacked by other Neanderthals who throw them around as if they were rag dolls, or smash their heads in with axes. Complimented by a totally inappropriate score from the De Angelis brothers that is best suited for an Indian restaurant, the narrative skips from the Stone Age to the Iron Age in less then ninety minutes, but what would one expect from bonkers Lenzi who also directed Incubo sulla città contaminate/Nightmare City (1980) and Cannibal Ferox (1981)? Compared to Lenzi’s take on alternative history, Il Padrone del mondo is a work of genius. Imitating Annaud’s movie, Cavallone drops dialogue by showing the life of Stone Age tribes with an eye on anthropological accuracy but going that extra mile but showcasing scenes of brains being scooped out of skulls and Homo sapiens being ripped to bits in loving detail by special effects maestros Rosario Prestopino and Roberto Pace. The film sold reasonably well abroad (heavily cut for a limited UK pre-cert) but was never released in Italy, the production company, Stefano Film, used the movie as an excuse to write-off financial losses or tax problems, to save themselves from bankruptcy. Cavallone, used to low budget productions, found Il Padrone del mondo to be a difficult movie to work on. Shot on the Canary Islands with a big budget with large cast and crew, Cavallone developed physical and mental issues from the film’s demanding shooting schedule and responsibilities – going so far as to personally teach his actors in a gym physical moves that a Neanderthal might have made. Surprisingly for an ambitious movie, Cavallone relied on relatively unknown actors such as eighteen year-old Swede Sven Kruger, Sacha D’Arc, a Yugoslavian ex-boxer who was “very efficient but completely crazy,” and Maria Vittoria Ghirlanda who was selected for a role because “she looked like a monkey… a pretty monkey, though!”

A sequence where a wild bear attacks the cavemen proved to be a bridge too far. Naturally, the cast did not warm to the idea of wrestling with a large bear with sharp teeth and claws. Rosario Prestopino, who had previously cut his cloth on Marino Girolami’s Zombie Holocaust (1980) and Lo Squartatore di New York/The New York Ripper (1982), had designed a fake bear suit with new special effects materials imported from America but proved too claustrophobic for the stuntman who was exhausted after three minutes of use. In desperation, Cavallone paid for two animals and their trainers for a scene by a waterfall where a bear attacks a group of cavemen. Unaware that bears enjoy playing in water, both of the animals bolted from their trainers to cool off in the waterfall and the Cavallone lost two days filming because he could not change the location due to permissions being granted. Not paying heed to “never work with children and animals” one of the bears sunk her claws into a trainer’s bicep during a shoot and the other animal escaped from her owner to charge down a field into a herd of sheep, killing twelve of them. Understandably, the shepherd was furious and called the police who charged the producer for a lot of money to pay for the damage. 

From the extremities of adult cinema Cavallone cut his cloth on domestic television for Rai until the mid-Nineties. His last venture in film was planned to be shot on digital video based on a true story of a virtual love affair that tragically ended in murder of a young woman and was to star Sherry Buchanan, but was ultimately shelved when the director died in November 1997. On reflection, Cavallone’s heart for Italian cinema had already died when the first reels of Spell and Blue Movie hit the canvas of the projector screen in a series of exploding colours and vibrant images, his remaining contribution to the medium being television that time forgot. It is ironic, and unfair in that his experimental genre cannon have been vastly ignored, less than ten years later, Italian cinema were to also die: its glory days finally laid to rest.


Alberto Cavallone Filmography

[DIRECTOR]
1959-1960
LA SPORCA GUERRA [The Dirty War] (documentary)
 
1962
LONTANO DAGLI OCCHI [Far from the Eyes]
director and story: Alberto Cavallone
script: Sergio Lentati and Massimo Magri
cast: Paride Calonghi, Sergio Lentati and Lino Patruno

1969
LE SALAMANDRE [The Salamander]
original shooting title: C'era una bionda [There was a Blonde]
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Erna Schurer, Beryl Cunningham and Anthony Vernon [Antonio Casale]
 
1970
DAL NOSTRO INVIATO A COPENHAGEN [From Our Copenhagen’s Correspondent]
working title: Così U.S.A. [So U.S.A]
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Jane Avril [Maria Pia Luzi], Anthony Vernon [Antonio Casale], Alain N Kalsjy [Walter Fabrizio] and George Stevenson [Dimitri]

1971
QUICKLY, SPARI E BACI A COLAZIONE [Quickly, Shootings and Kisses for Breakfast]
aka Follow Me, Disparos y besos a desayuno
director and script: Alberto Cavallone
screenplay: Alberto Cavallone, Mario Imperoli and Leone Imperoli
cast: Jane Avril [Maria Pia Luzi], Antonio Vernon [Antonio Casale], Beryl Cunningham, Magda Konopka, Claudie Lange
 
1973
AFRIKA
director and script: Alberto Cavallone
screenplay: based on a novel published by Edizioni 513 [note: probably pulp/porn literature]
cast: Ivano Staccioli, Jane Avril [Maria Pia Luzi] and Debebe Eshetu

1974
ZELDA
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Jane Avril [Maria Pia Luzi], Franca Gonella and James Harrys [Giuseppe Mattei]

1977
SPELL (DOLCE MATTATOIO) [Spell, (Sweet Slaughterhouse)]
aka L'uomo, la donna e la bestia [The Man, the Woman and the Beast], El hombre, la mujer y la bestia
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Jane Avril [Maria Pia Luzi], Paola Montenero, Martial Boschero, Giovanni De Angelis, Macha Magall and Mónica Zanchi

MALDOROR
aka I Canti di Maldoror
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Gianni Garko, Jane Avril [Maria Pia Luzi] and Sherry Buchanan

1978
BLUE MOVIE
aka Blue Movie Sexycompulsion – Blue Movie, Sexycompulsion
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Joseph Dickson, Patrizia [Dirce] Funari and Danielle Dugas
 
1980
BLOW JOB DOLCE LINGUA
aka La Strega nuda [The Naked Witch], Blow-job - Un soffio erotico
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Danilo Micheli, Anna Massarelli and Mirella Venturini

1981
LA GEMELLA EROTICA [Erotic Twin]
aka Due gocce d’acqua [Two Drops of Water]
director and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
screenplay: Rodolfo Putignani
cast: Patricia Behn [Patrizia Gasperini], Danilo Micheli and Ornella Picozzi

1982
PAT UNA DONNA PARTICOLARE [Pat, One Particular Woman]
aka Die Schöne Pat Und Der Supergeile Liliput
director: Baron Corvo [Alberto Cavallone]
cast: Serwan A Yoshar, Mika Barthel, Franco Coltorti, Dominique St Clair [Dominique Charon], Pauline Teutscher and Sabrina Mastrolorenzi [other credits on Italian print]: Joseph Fine, Mica Lin Yu, Alex Eu Sebi and Petit Loup

BABYSITTER
aka Il Nano erotico [The Erotic Dwarf], Being Captured – Essere tenuto, Petites Fesses juveniles, Petites Fesses juvéniles pour membres bienfaiteurs
director: Baron Corvo [Alberto Cavallone]
cast: Serwan A Yoshar, Mika Barthel, Franco Coltorti, Dominique St Clair [Dominique Charon], Pauline Teutscher and Sabrina Mastrolorenzi

1983
IL PADRONE DEL MONDO
aka Master of the World, Conqueror of the World, Los Forjadores del mundo
director, script and screenplay: Alberto Cavallone
cast: Sven Kruger, Sacha D’Arc, Viviana M Rispoli [Maria Viviana Rispoli], Vittoria M Garlanda [Maria Vittoria Ghirlanda] and Aldo Sambrell

DENTRO E FUORI LA CLASSE (five part documentary for Rai 1)
 
1984
I RACCONTI DELLA NONNA (telefilm: three episodes for Rai 1)
 
1986-1993
TELEFONO GIALLO
note: Cavallone provided material (exterior shooting, footage, adaptations and journalistic investigations) for several editions of this popular Rai 3  program
 
1991-1996
CHI L�HA VISTO
note: Cavallone provided material (exterior shooting, footage, adaptations and journalistic investigations) for several editions of this popular Rai 3  program

1994-1995
ULTIMO MINUTO
note: exterior shooting and scripts for Rai 3
 
1996-1997
FORMAT
note: three part film special for Rai 3

[OTHER WORKS]
1967
PER AMORE… PER MAGIA [For love… for magic]
director: Duccio Tessari
writing credits: Alberto Cavallone, Ennio De Concini, Franco Migliacci and Duccio Tessari
cast: Gianni Morandi, Rosemary Dexter, Mischa Auer, Daniele Vargas and Harold Bradley

1967
LA LUNGA SFIDA
directors: Mohamed Tazi and Nino Zanchin
writing credits: Alberto Cavallone, Fernando Di Leo and Nino Zanchin
starring: George Ardisson, Sieghardt Rupp, Luigi Pistilli, Katrin Schaake and Lisa Halvorsen

1983
LA GUERRA DEL FERRO – IRONMASTER [Ironmaster]
director: Umberto Lenzi
writing credits: Luciano Martino, Alberto Cavallone, Lea Martino, Dardano Sacchetti, Garbriel Rossini and Umberto Lenzi
starring: Sam Pasco, Elvire Audray, George Eastman [Luigi Montefiori], Pamela Prati, Jacques Herlin, Brian Redford [Danilo Mattei] and William Berger

Filmography by Jay Slater and Roberto Curti
Many thanks to Roberto Curti and Nocturno

v.1.1
8 February 2007
 
 
 
 
 

Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 13 Jul 2007 - 07:11
Great article Jay,nice to see an English language piece on this director.
Many thanks mate.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 13 Jul 2007 - 07:59
Nice one Jay, thanks for posting the article  :'(
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 13 Jul 2007 - 19:46
I decided to watch SPELL(L'uomo, la donna e la bestia) after reading Jay's cool article earlier today,never managed to get through it before but was glad i did this time.Be warned though the ending is strong stuff and might not appeal to all tastes.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CJ on 14 Jul 2007 - 12:38
Yes, Jay's in depth overview of Cavallone's career was a great read in The Dark Side. Nice to see it posted here too - good to know that some writers are still unafraid to share their work with the fan community. Nice one, Jay.

I was pretty much totally unaware of Cavallone and his work, so Jay's article was both interesting and informative. That's why I love sites like this - where you can both contribute and learn at the same time.  ::)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: LANZETTA on 14 Jul 2007 - 13:28
What's everyones favorite Eurocult books and magazines?
Bloodbuster's 220 page Italian crime review book CINICI INFAMI E VIOLENTI is amazing and has yet to be beaten,Italian language only but an essential reference guide.
CINE 70 is also Italian language but is filled with reviews of the most obscure Italian b-movies from the 70's and some great interviews and posterart,currently on #10 which features an Agostina Belli(Revolver,Night of the Devils etc)interview.
There's also the Midnight Media publications including their regular review guide IS IT UNCUT and their specials like BLAZING MAGNUMS and the GIALLO SCRAPBOOK,great.

([url]http://img170.imageshack.us/img170/2700/cine7001roh4.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://img513.imageshack.us/img513/149/blazingmagnums1coverah0.gif[/url]) ([url]http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/5548/cinicioh7.jpg[/url])


That BLAZING MAGNUM magazine looks very tempting but we no longer appear to have the link to purchase this on the new forum? :o
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 14 Jul 2007 - 13:51
That BLAZING MAGNUM magazine looks very tempting but we no longer appear to have the link to purchase this on the new forum? :o


You can buy it from the link below...  :D

Blazing Magnums LINK HERE (http://www.lovelockandload.com/Shop.htm)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: LANZETTA on 14 Jul 2007 - 13:57
Thanks  :-\

That was all part of the home page link etc to the old forum.All that stuff about polizios on dvd or only on vhs is really useful so i trust that resource is permanent? ::)

Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 14 Jul 2007 - 14:12
All that stuff about polizios on dvd or only on vhs is really useful so i trust that resource is permanent? ::)


Yes, it's not going anywhere, could do with updating mind. I don't think I've added anything new to it for about a year now.  :(
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 14 Jul 2007 - 14:18
From what I remember, the giallo section is a bit out of date too. Would you like a hand updating?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 14 Jul 2007 - 14:19
From what I remember, the giallo section is a bit out of date too. Would you like a hand updating?

Sure thing! Supply me with the info and I'll get it put on the site  :'(
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:34
Does anyone know how long it normally takes to receive books from FabPress? I ordered the massive NIGHTMARE USA and the LUCIANO ROSSI books a week ago and I assumed as much as I paid for shipping they would have been sent by now. This was my first time ordering from Britain. The other FabPress books I have I got from sellers in America but these two seemingly won't be in stock until later this year.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:39
They usually send things out within a week from my experience. Can you check on their site for your status?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:41
Does anyone know how long it normally takes to receive books from FabPress? I ordered the massive NIGHTMARE USA and the LUCIANO ROSSI books a week ago and I assumed as much as I paid for shipping they would have been sent by now. This was my first time ordering from Britain. The other FabPress books I have I got from sellers in America but these two seemingly won't be in stock until later this year.

As far as I know you can track your order via the website. Books usually take under a week for me, I'm in the UK. No idea about how long it takes to get to the US though, that 'Nightmare USA' book is huge though, I reckon it might take at least 10 days maybe 2 weeks... It'll be worth the wait though as it's an amzing book, the Rossi book is really good aswell.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:42
Yes, and it said they haven't been shipped yet. For both books it cost me $97 total. Why is it so expensive to send books from the UK? I was going to buy a large supply of back issues of DARK SIDE magazine but the guy said it be too much in shipping for all the issues I wanted so I never found out exactly how much it was. DARK SIDE is $2 more here so it costs me $12 an issue when I buy one.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:47
Thanks for the responses. BTW, great piece on Cavallone. Although I'm not a fan of porn, great read nonetheless. Jay, I also have your KILLING FOR CULTURE book. An exhaustive compilation on the Mondo/Snuff movie genres. I frequently peruse through the passages on occasion. I recently acquired a copy of ADDIO ULTIMO UOMO based on info from this book as well as SAVAGE MAN, SAVAGE BEAST. I'm not as curious about the Mondo genre as I once was, but these two piqued my interest over the past few years.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:47
Yes, and it said they haven't been shipped yet.
Bloody Francis Brewster eh? :-\ :-\

Quote
   BTW, great piece on Cavallone. Although I'm not a fan of porn, great read                       
I wouldn't call Cavallone's work porn,his last few films yes but the majority of his output was surreal and experimental filmmaking that was very original.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:49
Yes, and it said they haven't been shipped yet. For both books it cost me $97 total. Why is it so expensive to send books from the UK?


To be fair to FAB, $97 (£49) isn't that expensive for those two books including shipping. To have the 'Nightmare USA' (http://www.fabpress.com/vsearch.php?CO=FAB070) book shipped within the UK it would cost $16 (£8)... I think it's expensive for you due to the terrible dollar/pound exchange rate...

Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:50
Jay, I also have your KILLING FOR CULTURE book. An exhaustive compilation on the Mondo/Snuff movie genres.
Jay didn't write this,think it was David Kerekes and David Slater
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:52
Yes, and it said they haven't been shipped yet.

send Harvey or Francis an email asap I'm pretty sure they'll get straight back to you with an update on your order.

info@fabpress.com
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 15 Jul 2007 - 16:55
Jay, I also have your KILLING FOR CULTURE book. An exhaustive compilation on the Mondo/Snuff movie genres.
Jay didn't write this,think it was David Kerekes and David Slater

OOPS! Sorry! I do have your EATEN ALIVE! book though. his name is on that one I'm sure! BTW, what happened to that snuff movie from Bernard Rose? There was an interview with him about this movie in a DARK SIDE issue a while back.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jay on 17 Jul 2007 - 06:56
Thank you for your kind words, all. I like to share material as we're all fans of these movies at the end of the day, right? And nope, I had nothing to do with the snuff book but it's great stuff and very informative. And the Rose snuff movie? I have to be careful but I may have caught this on the big screen last November at Horrorthon in Dublin. If that was the same movie, it was pretty damned bad...

Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 30 Jul 2007 - 12:08
Just ordered this from Kult Video

(http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f22/lovelockandload/VideoMania.jpg)

120 rare video covers with accompanying text in Italian & English. Couldn't find any reviews or know anyone who has this so I bought it blind. It's Nocturno Magazine/Kult Video joint effort so it should be good.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 30 Jul 2007 - 12:15
Just ordered this from Kult Video

([url]http://i44.photobucket.com/albums/f22/lovelockandload/VideoMania.jpg[/url])

120 rare video covers with accompanying text in Italian & English. Couldn't find any reviews or know anyone who has this so I bought it blind. It's Nocturno Magazine/Kult Video joint effort so it should be good.

Looks good, how much was it Jonny?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 30 Jul 2007 - 12:18
Looks good, how much was it Jonny?


16 Euros, not sure about the postage yet as they've not emailed me with the details yet.

Link to Kult Video Book info HERE (http://www.kultvideo.com/scheda_altri.asp?item=14186&type=BOOK&key=3)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CJ on 31 Jul 2007 - 01:18
I'll add IMMORAL TALES.  It covers in great detail the films and background of Jess Franco and Jean Rollin among others, and has turned me on to a number of great films.
([url]http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/2352/tohillzu0.jpg[/url])


Wow - that's a better cover than the one I have! LOL!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 31 Jul 2007 - 18:03
Just ordered from Thrauma(Italy):

Cine 70 #9 featuring Agostina Belli interview

and from Glittering Images:
Psychopathia Sexualis in Italian Sinema(Incredibly strange movie fantasies from “cineromanzi” 1968-1972) featuring Top Sensation,Delirio Caldo,Strange Vice of Mrs Wardh,La veritá secondo Satana etc.
Will post thread on this when i get it ::)

(http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/9620/psychosexmz2.jpg)

 (http://img70.imageshack.us/img70/4292/mob7351177277538ls6.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: vigilanteforce on 31 Jul 2007 - 18:17
That article on Raimondo Del Balzo sounds very interesting, i love his MIDNIGHT BLUE (1979). Wish it was in English.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 31 Jul 2007 - 18:40
That article on Raimondo Del Balzo sounds very interesting, i love his MIDNIGHT BLUE (1979). Wish it was in English.
Now that would be great,there's some amazing articles/interviews in Cine 70 and the early issues of Nocturno on Stelvio Massi,Jacopetti,Mario Bianchi,Massimo Pirri,D'amato etc that i'd love to see translated.Some real gems of information that you never see in/on English language magazines/websites,cool way to learn Italian though which i'm getting better and better at.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 31 Jul 2007 - 19:48
Speaking of Nocturno Magazine... Does anyone know where I can get Nocturno #14 (with the Di Leo Dossier), Nocturno Book #21 - SOLAMENTE GIALLO PARTE 1 and Nocturno Book #22 - SOLAMENTE GIALLO PARTE 2?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 31 Jul 2007 - 20:00
Here it is,it's part of the new series,the other 2 you mentioned are from the old series/volumes back in 1998/99/2000.I think you'll pay a bit more for those though!
 http://www.thrauma.it/dettaglio.php?dettaglio=libri&id=396  (http://www.thrauma.it/dettaglio.php?dettaglio=libri&id=396)

Here's the Nocturno archive site which lists every issue and dossier as well as the specials and one-offs.
 http://www.nocturno.it/op/archivio.php?tabella=schedenumeri  (http://www.nocturno.it/op/archivio.php?tabella=schedenumeri)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 31 Jul 2007 - 20:32
Here's the Nocturno archive site which lists every issue and dossier as well as the specials and one-offs.
 [url]http://www.nocturno.it/op/archivio.php?tabella=schedenumeri[/url]  ([url]http://www.nocturno.it/op/archivio.php?tabella=schedenumeri[/url])


That's where I got my info from Stephen, can you order them direct from Nocturno then?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 31 Jul 2007 - 20:37

That's where I got my info from Stephen, can you order them direct from Nocturno then?
I think so if you click the 'Acquista questo numero' option but you can only pay by bank transfer in Italy and some postal option ,there seems to be no Paypal.I was gutted when i first tried as there's a load of stuff i want,maybe Thrauma might be able to help?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 31 Jul 2007 - 20:56
I think so if you click the 'Acquista questo numero' option but you can only pay by bank transfer in Italy and some postal option ,there seems to be no Paypal.I was gutted when i first tried as there's a load of stuff i want,maybe Thrauma might be able to help?

I'll give Thrauma a shout when I've got some spare money, I just spent £40 at Kult Video today...  ???
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: death_proof_reg on 31 Jul 2007 - 23:12
can anyone point me in the right direction of these argento books? i'd love to give either one a read.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Paul on 01 Aug 2007 - 08:16
can anyone point me in the right direction of these argento books? i'd love to give either one a read.


You’re best bet is Alan Jones’ PROFONDO ARGENTO – Jones has been on every one of Argento’s sets since OPERA in 1987, and the book is the best out of the three I have (I also own ART OF DARKNESS and BROKEN MIRRORS, BROKEN MINDS). As you’d expect, it’s as well researched as it is well written.

Profondo Argento (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Profondo-Argento-Alan-Jones/dp/190325423X/ref=pd_bowtega_1/203-5532560-3518318?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1185959575&sr=1-1)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 01 Aug 2007 - 10:07
can anyone point me in the right direction of these argento books? i'd love to give either one a read.


You’re best bet is Alan Jones’ PROFONDO ARGENTO – Jones has been on every one of Argento’s sets since OPERA in 1987, and the book is the best out of the three I have (I also own ART OF DARKNESS and BROKEN MIRRORS, BROKEN MINDS). As you’d expect, it’s as well researched as it is well written.

Profondo Argento ([url]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Profondo-Argento-Alan-Jones/dp/190325423X/ref=pd_bowtega_1/203-5532560-3518318?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1185959575&sr=1-1[/url])



Paul - thanx!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: death_proof_reg on 01 Aug 2007 - 10:39
Nice one mate, need to get that asap.

Only movie related books I've read (in that sense) are Lynch on Lynch and If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B movie actor by Bruce Cambell
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Paul on 01 Aug 2007 - 10:41
Nice one mate, need to get that asap.

Only movie related books I've read (in that sense) are Lynch on Lynch and If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B movie actor by Bruce Cambell

Lynch On Lynch is great, eh? I also recommend Cronenberg On Cronenberg, but there are way more books - I need to compile a list of the great ones.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 03 Aug 2007 - 19:15
Finally got the NIGHTMARE USA and the LUCIANO ROSSI books today and as expected, FabPress proves once again they make the best damn film reference books on the planet!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 03 Aug 2007 - 19:24
Finally got the NIGHTMARE USA and the LUCIANO ROSSI books today and as expected, FabPress proves once again they make the best damn film reference books on the planet!

Glad they finally arrived, how many weeks was that? 3 or 4? I dread to think how long my Tim Lucas Mario Bava book is going to take to get to me from the US...

Both, like you said, are excellent books. I haven't dived into the Nightmare USA book that much but I read all the Rossi book in one go and really liked it.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 03 Aug 2007 - 19:29
Has the Lucas Bava book FINALLY seen release? It took a millenium to get it out if it has indeed been released. ::)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 03 Aug 2007 - 19:33
Has the Lucas Bava book FINALLY seen release? It took a millenium to get it out if it has indeed been released. ::)


Yes it has! I've had it on pre-order for nearly 4 years and I know a few people who paid for it a lot longer ago than that!

It ships out at the end of the month. More info HERE (http://bavabook.blogspot.com/).
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 03 Aug 2007 - 19:36
I imagine a lot of people were getting angry that they had paid for a book that may not come out. I almost pre-ordered it myself but didn't. FabPress did one I think which I would like to get but I don't think it's in print anymore. Luckily, I was able to get there 10 YEARS OF TERROR: BRITISH HORROR FILMS OF THE 70s in Hardback before it went OOP as well as several others.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 03 Aug 2007 - 19:38
I imagine a lot of people were getting angry that they had paid for a book that may not come out.
He did give refunds to customers who didn't want to wait.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:11
Speaking of the Luciano Rossi book, as many times as I've seen THE FORGOTTEN PISTOLERO you'd think I'd of recognized him in this film. After perusing the book I've seen more films with him in them than I thought.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:19
Has the Lucas Bava book FINALLY seen release? It took a millenium to get it out if it has indeed been released. ::)


Yes it has! I've had it on pre-order for nearly 4 years and I know a few people who paid for it a lot longer ago than that!

It ships out at the end of the month. More info HERE ([url]http://bavabook.blogspot.com/[/url]).


$250 + $40 Postage, has it got gold embossed pages or something!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:21
$250 + $40 Postage, has it got gold embossed pages or something!

I pre-ordered mine for $120 inc postage and at the time the $ was as bad as it is now. I think I got a bargain  ::)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:28
I pre-ordered mine for $120 inc postage and at the time the $ was as bad as it is now. I think I got a bargain  ::)
You got a bargain mate,wait till it comes out and everyone will be wishing they pre-ordered it for that price.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:29
Think i'll give it a miss at that price, greedy cunts! "$$$$!"
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: IL COMMISSARIO on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:38
Damn! It went up over $120!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 03 Aug 2007 - 20:41
Think i'll give it a miss at that price, greedy cunts! "$$$$!"

I don't think it's a greed thing, more like they're possibly going to get hit in the pocket by shipping out all the European pre-orders. I just checked over at the US Postal Service website and it's quoting $37 as the cheapest way to post a 12lb book to the UK. That works out that I paid about £40 for the book and £20 postage.

I'd say they're possibly going to be making a loss on some of the pre-orders.

And BTW the price change doesn't take effect until later this month, it's currently $130 if you live in the US and $160 for everyone else.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 06 Aug 2007 - 17:19
Now this looks interesting,Matt Blake and Julian Granger are putting together a new book about obscure cinema titled 'The Wild Eye'.The first issue features Alain Delon,Elio Petri and Gianni Crea who made 'Non sparate suui bambini' ::),judging by the contents it looks like it'll be mostly Euro oriented.
Essential IMO.

More info here:
   http://www.europeanfilmreview.co.uk/mattblake/writing/wildeye.htm (http://www.europeanfilmreview.co.uk/mattblake/writing/wildeye.htm)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 06 Aug 2007 - 19:59
Now this looks interesting,Matt Blake and Julian Granger are putting together a new book about obscure cinema titled 'The Wild Eye'.The first issue features Alain Delon,Elio Petri and Gianni Crea who made 'Non sparate suui bambini' ::),judging by the contents it looks like it'll be mostly Euro oriented.
Essential IMO.

More info here:
   [url]http://www.europeanfilmreview.co.uk/mattblake/writing/wildeye.htm[/url] ([url]http://www.europeanfilmreview.co.uk/mattblake/writing/wildeye.htm[/url])


Good news! Julian's the man to have on board with any book project so it's safe to say this one will be very well researched.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Paul on 07 Aug 2007 - 10:54
Now this looks interesting,Matt Blake and Julian Granger are putting together a new book about obscure cinema titled 'The Wild Eye'.The first issue features Alain Delon,Elio Petri and Gianni Crea who made 'Non sparate suui bambini' ::),judging by the contents it looks like it'll be mostly Euro oriented.
Essential IMO.

More info here:
   [url]http://www.europeanfilmreview.co.uk/mattblake/writing/wildeye.htm[/url] ([url]http://www.europeanfilmreview.co.uk/mattblake/writing/wildeye.htm[/url])


Good news! Julian's the man to have on board with any book project so it's safe to say this one will be very well researched.


I second that - and as for the list of folk being profiled, I'm excited already.  There's just not enough written about Petri.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 20 Aug 2007 - 11:26
Got issues #7 and #8 of Italian language genre magazine CINE 70 from Kult a few days ago,both are packed with cool stuff including  interviews with Castellari regular Massimo Vanni,Tony Kendall,D'amato h/c porn legend Mark Shannon and Corinne Cléry star of Story of O and Hitch-Hike amongst others.
Full of articles and admat/posterart of the more obscure Italian genre cinema from the 60's and 70's and all beautifully presented and designed,essential.
(http://img462.imageshack.us/img462/4447/p8200248yc0.jpg)
(http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/4584/p8200247lu2.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 20 Aug 2007 - 11:28
Whats that pic of Vanni on the bottom of the cine70 on the left, he looks like Chuck Norris in "Missing in Action" :-\
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Mart85 on 20 Aug 2007 - 14:40
Cool stuff, Stephen, thanks for posting.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 23 Oct 2007 - 20:34
The new issue of Is It..Uncut? is due out soon but i'm not impressed with the new look cover,looks a bit too Fangoria for my liking.Contents seem ok though including reviews of Assassination,Getting Even,Craze etc
(http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/9232/uncut23jn9.gif)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Wostry on 20 Nov 2007 - 19:04
IMHO the best film magazine of the world is the german SPLATTING IMAGE. Published since 1990, it deals with with every kind of cult film. The resident eurocult expert is one Christian Kessler: the guy has the greatest knowledge in the field I've ever encountered and he writes magnificently.

He also wrote the books WILKOMMEN IN DER HÖLLE (a spaghetti western encyclopedia) and the italian horror overview DAS WILDE AUGE.

Some of his SI-articles are up on his awfully designed website, but are in german of course:

http://christiankessler.de/inhalt.htm
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 20 Nov 2007 - 19:19
He also wrote the books WILKOMMEN IN DER HÖLLE (a spaghetti western encyclopedia) and the italian horror overview DAS WILDE AUGE.
Do you know if this has a load of pictures in it or not, i don't mind having books i can't undertand as long as there are loads of great pics ::)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Wostry on 20 Nov 2007 - 19:26
I own only DAS WILDE AUGE (not in it's original form, a hungaro-german friend of mine photocopied the whole book for me :D - all of his books are OOP and very hard to find, on the german ebay they go for incredible prices) it has good picture material but nothing too exotic, in his books it's the text that counts.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 20 Nov 2007 - 19:33
Christian Kessler certainly knows his stuff,there's a couple of very informative letters from him in John Martin's 'Giallo Pages' magazine from the early 90's which are a great read.Also seen him on various German dvd releases doing interviews and extras.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 20 Nov 2007 - 19:38
Christian Kessler certainly knows his stuff,there's a couple of very informative letters from him in John Martin's 'Giallo Pages' magazine from the early 90's which are a great read.

It's in one of those letters he informs us about Marissa Mel being involved in a 'water sports' photo shoot and looking like she's really enjoying herself.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 20 Nov 2007 - 19:52
It's in one of those letters he informs us about Marissa Mel being involved in a 'water sports' photo shoot and looking like she's really enjoying herself.
That's one of them  ::)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 17 Jan 2008 - 09:53
Just recieved the new issue of CINE 70 #10 from Italy this morning,features a great 30 page interview with Guido Zurli(Target,Strangler of Vienna,Virgin of Bali etc) plus articles and features on obscure Italian genre cinema from the 60's/70's all spread over 70 glossy pages.
Also noticed that they've reprinted #2 and added a new cover,has an interview with Mario Caiano plus articles on Femi Benussi and Olga Karlatos.

(http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/7775/cine7010qj9.gif) (http://img251.imageshack.us/img251/7749/cine702fc5.gif)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Bogan The Wanderer on 17 Jan 2008 - 21:53
Which would be the best place to order CINE 70 - Kult or Thrauma?  I live in Australia and don't speak German or Italian so I'm just wondering which shop would be the most reliable and user friendly.

  I just got MORRICONE WESTERN and the ITALIA SEXY COMEDIES book will be in my hands in a few days.  I also received Midnight Media's CASTELLARI booklet, which is very amusing in places (especially the bit where Fulci told Castellari to fuck off), but I wish they'd stuck a few reviews of his movies in there as well, maybe making it similar to the old DAVID WARBECK-THE MAN AND HIS MOVIES booklet. 

The design of A VIOLENT PROFESSIONAL is really amazing and it was nice to see Craig Ledbetter get a quote on the back cover.  I wish he'd bring his magazine back.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Stephen Grimes on 17 Jan 2008 - 21:56
Which would be the best place to order CINE 70 - Kult or Thrauma?  I live in Australia and don't speak German or Italian so I'm just wondering which shop would be the most reliable and user friendly.
CINE 70 is an Italian language magazine,i tend to use Onlyscore but Kult are pretty good.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: heinz klett on 30 Jun 2008 - 12:10
i wonder why nobody has mentioned marco giusti's books:

Marco Giusti: Stracult - Dizionario del cinema italiano di genere
http://www.bloodbuster.com/index.php?idlingua=1&pageid=dettagli2&idprodotto=1990

Marco Giusti: Dizionario dei western all'italiana
http://www.bloodbuster.com/index.php?idlingua=1&pageid=dettagli2&idprodotto=3536

these are the definitive reference books on their subjects; "Dizionario del cinema italiano di genere" is oop, but definitely worth tracking down. of course, both are in italian language only and without any pictures.

marco giusti is THE expert on italian genre movies. he selected the films for the "cinema segreto italiano" and "spaghetti western" series at the venice film festival, and he wrote the preface to bloodbuster's "cinic, infami e violenti".  so, if you understand a little bit of italian you should get these books and forget all the second-rate stuff published elsewhere.

i can't recommend the book "willkommen in der hoelle" by christian kessler. the guy certainly knows the subject but his problem is, he writes in an awful pupil magazine style that spoils it all for the reader and the images are of very bad quality.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 30 Jun 2008 - 12:22
Welcome to the forum Heinz!

Thanks for recommending 'Dizionario del cinema italiano di genere', I'd not heard of it before but will definitely be keeping a look out for a second hand copy.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: mook on 17 Jul 2010 - 20:34
thought I'd post under this link, but I'm not sure if this is essential - has anyone read this or heard of it? I'll give it a go if no one else has.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Poliziotteschi-Films-Violenta-Double-Calibro/dp/1156860237/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279402165&sr=8-2 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Poliziotteschi-Films-Violenta-Double-Calibro/dp/1156860237/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279402165&sr=8-2)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 18 Jul 2010 - 04:40
thought I'd post under this link, but I'm not sure if this is essential - has anyone read this or heard of it? I'll give it a go if no one else has.

[url]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Poliziotteschi-Films-Violenta-Double-Calibro/dp/1156860237/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279402165&sr=8-2[/url] ([url]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Poliziotteschi-Films-Violenta-Double-Calibro/dp/1156860237/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279402165&sr=8-2[/url])


I've come across items like that on Amazon a few times recently.... and I'm not entirely sure what they are.

clicky (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sloppy-Seconds-Albums-Trouble-Destroyed/dp/1157137334/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279431342&sr=1-1)

clicky (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Homestead-Records-Artists-Dinosaur-Johnston/dp/115562338X/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1279431509&sr=1-6)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 18 Jul 2010 - 05:04
Apparently they're wikipedia articles that have been licensed and published. Odd....
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: mook on 18 Jul 2010 - 08:02
Apparently they're wikipedia articles that have been licensed and published. Odd....
Hmm, thanks for that - I'll probably just read the wiki articles then and leave it at that.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: THE RITA HN on 22 Jul 2010 - 08:22
some of my standard film reference books i use again and again include:

I COLORI DEL BUIO - IL CINEMA THRILLING ITALIANO DAL 1930 AL 1979 (Luca Rea)
LA COMMEDIA EROTICA ITALIANA - VENT'ANNI DI CINEMA SEXY "MADE IN ITALY" (Michele Giordano)
DELIRIUM - A GUIDE TO ITALIAN EXPLOITATION CINEMA 1975-1979
99 DONNE - STELLE A STELLINE DEL CINEMA ITALIANO (Manlio Gomarasca and Davide Pulici)
JESS FRANCO CHRONICLES (Andreas Bethmann)
FORGOTTEN HORRORS (George F. Turner and Michael H. Price)
THE MEXICAN MASKED WRESTLER AND MONSTER FILMOGRAPHY (Robert Michael Cotter)

...and various others depending on what genre i'm obsessing over, but nothing for reference compares to the magazines:
EUROPEAN TRASH CINEMA, THE CHEESEPLANT, NOCTURNO, AMARCORD, GIALLO PAGES, etc.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CountFosco on 04 Jul 2013 - 11:59
Aside from maybe the grand gothic horrors of Mario Bava and Dario Argento, gialli are my first love when it comes to Italian cult cinema. However, I really want to dip my toe into the other dominant streams such as Spaghetti Westerns and the Italian crime films.

Can anyone recommend any good entry point books on these topics? Recall FAB Press did one on the Westerns a few years back, any good?
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: DjangoLi on 04 Jul 2013 - 16:52
Aside from maybe the grand gothic horrors of Mario Bava and Dario Argento, gialli are my first love when it comes to Italian cult cinema. However, I really want to dip my toe into the other dominant streams such as Spaghetti Westerns and the Italian crime films.

Can anyone recommend any good entry point books on these topics? Recall FAB Press did one on the Westerns a few years back, any good?

For Eurocrime films I would recommend Città Violente: Il cinema poliziesco italiano by Antonio Bruschini and Antonio Tentori, with an introduction by Enzo Castellari. I've yet to read a better guide to the genre. All in Italian, though...
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 04 Jul 2013 - 17:03
Aside from maybe the grand gothic horrors of Mario Bava and Dario Argento, gialli are my first love when it comes to Italian cult cinema. However, I really want to dip my toe into the other dominant streams such as Spaghetti Westerns and the Italian crime films.

Can anyone recommend any good entry point books on these topics? Recall FAB Press did one on the Westerns a few years back, any good?

For Eurocrime films I would recommend Città Violente: Il cinema poliziesco italiano by Antonio Bruschini and Antonio Tentori, with an introduction by Enzo Castellari. I've yet to read a better guide to the genre. All in Italian, though...
I've got one of them myself, it was handy for the crime filmography in the back. I think it's been updated since, they still had Lira when I got my one.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CountFosco on 04 Jul 2013 - 17:22
Thanks guys but I probably should've clarified. I don't read/speak Italian at any level, Ha! Ha! Strictly after books written in English on Italian crime films and westerns.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 04 Jul 2013 - 17:26
Thanks guys but I probably should've clarified. I don't read/speak Italian at any level.
Neither do I  :-\

Obviously I know what quite a few words mean, but to read sentences..... no.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CountFosco on 04 Jul 2013 - 17:49
I guess I'm after something like the FAB Press books on Lucio Fulci or Zombie Cinema but for Italian crime films. Basically, hoping to read a book companion and eventually watch the Eurocrime documentary as the perfect launch-pad for my immersion in this unexplored area of film.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 04 Jul 2013 - 19:03
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51r9AhI1mVL._.jpg)


This is a great book. It's in German but there's enough filmographies and pictures that transgress any language barriers.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CountFosco on 04 Jul 2013 - 19:10
Forgive my ignorance, I had assumed that there would've been at least one book on the subject in English? Man, that is a book just begging to be written by someone.

Amazes me that so few books on gialli and such-like are published in English given the dedicated following this type of cinema has.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Kevin Coed on 04 Jul 2013 - 19:15
There is the Blazing Magnums A5 zine type stylee thing but that's pretty much it. Some of us did start having a go at doing s book ourselves but we're ostensibly a bunch of lazy fuckers with demanding families.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CountFosco on 04 Jul 2013 - 19:26
There is the Blazing Magnums A5 zine type stylee thing but that's pretty much it. Some of us did start having a go at doing s book ourselves but we're ostensibly a bunch of lazy fuckers with demanding families.

Thank you for the tip regarding 'Blazing Magnums' and the notion of doing some sort of community research/written eBook on the topic is an astoundingly good idea. I'd be very happy to contribute to such endeavours.

I totally sympathise with that last remark, pretty much sums my life up too :)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: DjangoLi on 04 Jul 2013 - 20:45
Not sure I mentioned it before but I would thoroughly recommend Matt Blake and David Deal's Eurospy guide - it's an essential reference guide to the genre... much like Luca Rea's book 'I Colori del Buio' is for gialli. Luckily the Eurospy book IS written in English :) The only snag is that it's out of print by the looks of things. :(

Also surprised there aren't any English books on Eurocrime - someone should get Matt Blake to try his hand at it... for my money he's the best genre writer around, and, no, I don't know him personally!

There's a mountain of information over at his blog if you haven't seen it:

http://www.thewildeye.co.uk/blog/ (http://www.thewildeye.co.uk/blog/)

Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: CountFosco on 04 Jul 2013 - 21:06
Thanks for the info. Will take a look :)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Farmer_J on 04 Jul 2013 - 21:08
There is the Blazing Magnums A5 zine type stylee thing but that's pretty much it. Some of us did start having a go at doing s book ourselves but we're ostensibly a bunch of lazy fuckers with demanding families.

Well, I'm not married, and have a lot of current spare time, I might have a crack at it.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Inspector Tanzi on 04 Jul 2013 - 21:29

Also surprised there aren't any English books on Eurocrime - someone should get Matt Blake to try his hand at it... for my money he's the best genre writer around, and, no, I don't know him personally!

Julian Grainger was going to do one years ago but it got put on the back burner.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Scyther on 04 Jul 2013 - 22:24
Not sure if this has been mentioned, but my buddy and blogger David Zuzelo self-released a tome of Italian action flick reviews titled Tough to Kill. Really enjoyable stuff. Interviewed him here, with links to purchased the book from Lulu.com

http://www.examiner.com/article/exploitation-life-an-interview-with-author-and-blogger-david-zuzelo (http://www.examiner.com/article/exploitation-life-an-interview-with-author-and-blogger-david-zuzelo)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: broonage on 05 Jul 2013 - 08:27
Not sure if this has been mentioned, but my buddy and blogger David Zuzelo self-released a tome of Italian action flick reviews titled Tough to Kill. Really enjoyable stuff. Interviewed him here, with links to purchased the book from Lulu.com

[url]http://www.examiner.com/article/exploitation-life-an-interview-with-author-and-blogger-david-zuzelo[/url] ([url]http://www.examiner.com/article/exploitation-life-an-interview-with-author-and-blogger-david-zuzelo[/url])


Great book!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Farmer_J on 05 Jul 2013 - 19:22
I had an idea a while ago for a book on Spaghetti Westerns on much lesser known actors, and I know one has been done on people like Gordon Mitchell, William Berger, etc, but I wanted to look up about actors like Jeff Cameron, Fred Robsham, and such other much lesser known ones. I've been interested especially in Cameron, because there is very little info about him, I'd love to know about his life, etc. No one knows how he died either, back in 1985. But thats just an idea I was thinking of.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny Powers on 10 Feb 2014 - 20:07
Sorry to bump an old thread, but I've got the FAB press book Any Gun Can Play, and that's a really good English language book on Spaghetti Westerns!
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny on 10 Feb 2014 - 20:29
Sorry to bump an old thread, but I've got the FAB press book Any Gun Can Play, and that's a really good English language book on Spaghetti Westerns!


I'm not a massive fan of spaghettis but I've heard good things, amazingly* the limited edition signed and numbered hardback is still available form FAB...

http://www.fabpress.com/books/any-gun-can-play-hardback.html (http://www.fabpress.com/books/any-gun-can-play-hardback.html)

Any Gun Can Play: The Essential Guide to Euro-westerns (book preview) Hardcover Edition (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cbs4lUafQqc#ws)

*I say that because a few years ago their limited editions used to sell out pretty much on the day they were published.
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Jonny Powers on 11 Feb 2014 - 00:09
Sorry to bump an old thread, but I've got the FAB press book Any Gun Can Play, and that's a really good English language book on Spaghetti Westerns!


I'm not a massive fan of spaghettis but I've heard good things, amazingly* the limited edition signed and numbered hardback is still available form FAB...

[url]http://www.fabpress.com/books/any-gun-can-play-hardback.html[/url] ([url]http://www.fabpress.com/books/any-gun-can-play-hardback.html[/url])

Any Gun Can Play: The Essential Guide to Euro-westerns (book preview) Hardcover Edition ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cbs4lUafQqc#ws[/url])

*I say that because a few years ago their limited editions used to sell out pretty much on the day they were published.


Wow! I've got a paperback copy, might just sell that and grab this one...
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Vizzini on 15 Nov 2016 - 22:43
i wonder why nobody has mentioned marco giusti's books:

marco giusti is THE expert on italian genre movies
You can currently find Marco Giusti's 2010 book on eurospy (http://amzn.to/2eXIrvX) at Amazon.it with a 55% off price promotion. Italian language only, but plenty of beautiful images.
(http://www.lafeltrinelli.it/static/images-1/l/303/2988303.jpg)
Title: Re: Essential Eurocult books/magazines
Post by: Bogan the Wanderer on 15 Mar 2017 - 22:37
Quite a few books coming out by the look of it -

Howard Hughes has a new spaghetti western book in the works - his biggest yet.

Death in the Desert: The Complete Spaghetti Westerns Film Guide
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51WWcLuFfoL._SX350_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

"Instantly recognizable from their music and visual style, spaghetti westerns are a magnificently popular cult film genre. Through home media, they've stayed alive and available to an avid audience, enjoying remarkable influence and lasting success. In over 500 detailed film reviews covering 20 years of westerns in Europe, genre expert Howard Hughes portrays European western films and filmmaking during their frenzied, popular heyday. He narrates the spaghetti western story from the genre's early, tentative days to its explosive golden era following the success of A Fistful of Dollars and the mass-produced scramble of films that swamped cinemas in the late 1960s, before the gradual falling off of enchantment with the genre. Death in the Desert also covers other westerns made in Europe in the 1960s and '70s: the early West German "Winnetou" westerns, swashbuckling Spanish "Zorro" movies, kung-fu westerns, German musical and comedy westerns, American and British westerns filmed in Spain and East Germany. This essential read for cinephiles, collectors and completists, is fully illustrated with rare posters and stills."

Roberto Curti has a new volume on Freda out in a month or two -

Riccardo Freda: The Life and Works of a Born Filmmaker

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51eHAAe4SdL._SX348_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

"In an eclectic career spanning four decades, Italian director Riccardo Freda (1909-1999) produced films of remarkable technical skill and powerful visual style, including the swashbuckler Black Eagle (1946), an adaptation of Les Miserables (1947), the peplum Theodora, Slave Empress (1954) and a number of cult-favorite Gothic and horror films such as I Vampiri (1957), The Horrible Dr. Hichcock (1962) and The Ghost (1963). Freda was first championed in the 1960s by French critics who labeled him "the European Raoul Walsh," and enjoyed growing critical esteem over the years. This book covers his life and career for the first time in English, with detailed analyses of his films and exclusive interviews with his collaborators and family."

Electric Dreamhouse Press have a new volume coming on EYES WITHOUT A FACE (won't link the cover as the pic is bloody huge), and Stephen Thrower has two more books on the way - a heavily updated release of BEYOND TERROR with 120 more pages of text and lots of new illustrations, and his second Franco book, of which he says "The word count for Vol.2 currently stands at 216,000 plus about ten thousand in appendices, so it's definitely on course."  Too much bloody stuff to purchase it seems.