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Author Topic: Blazing Magnum / Una magnum special per Tony Saitta (Alberto de Martino, 1976)  (Read 28830 times)

Captain

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Glad you enjoyed it Captain ::)

Love it and just watched it again.
I'm a big fan of car chases and i've seen alot of em but one is a piece of art!
The tranny scene is amazing!

Cool to hear Whitman does alot (all?) of his own stunts too.


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Inspector Tanzi

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I'm a big fan of car chases and i've seen alot of em but one is a piece of art!

Great chase isn't it, i'd go as far to say it's better than the one in BULLITT :) :) :)
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"When I read the book of Mormon, I feel closer to Jesus Christ."

Captain

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I'm a big fan of car chases and i've seen alot of em but one is a piece of art!

Great chase isn't it, i'd go as far to say it's better than the one in BULLITT :) :) :)

Indeed it is! This one and the one in The Seven Ups top a lot of famous chases.
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Pollanet

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the chase of Bullit is probably one of the most famous chase scenes in cinema... but it's really the best?! I don't think so

I enjoy so much the ending of Bullit in the airport, a masterpiece of suspance... but not very much the chase... i noted it's faster than reality, as b-movies  :-*

i think that all the chase in Blazing magnum was directed by Remi Julienne, someone says that Aristide Massaccesi/Joe D'Amato was the real second unit director, but a very good car chases can be directed only by a stunt, i think...
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Captain

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The Bullet chase is a bit overrated, that's a fact. Ever seen the original Gone In 60 Seconds? Now that's a chase!
Remi Julliene is the absolute master of car stunts on european grounds. Recently showed Cold Sweat to my girl and even though she isn't interested in car chase stuff at all, she even said, "that's some crazy driving". I told her "that's Remi Julliene baby".
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Inspector Tanzi

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Didn't he do HIGHWAY RACER and Merli got pissed off because he wasn't allowed to do ALL his own driving. (or something like that)
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Pollanet

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me too likes very much car chases, even if... I don't drive  :(

i think that a good crime movie without a chase is like to have an excellent dinner without bread  :-*

but it's difficult, a chase can be an explosion of energy but also something of a bit ridicoulos, you need also a good score

remi julienne was often over the limits, someone of his staff died or was seriously hurted, but he was absolutely the king
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Jay

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An old review of mine...

UNA MAGNUM SPECIAL PER TONY SAITTA (1976)                                                                   
aka A Special Magnum for Tony Saitta. Blazing Magnum. Blazing Magnums. Shadows in a Room. Strange Shadows in a Room

director: Martin Herbert [Alberto de Martino]
starring: Stuart Whitman. John Saxon. Martin Landau. Carole Laure. Gayle Hunnicutt. Tisa Farrow. [+ possible uncredited cameo from Charles Napier as a detective at train station]

Tony Saitta: “Julie, was Louise very upset?”
Julie: “The most upset I’ve ever seen her.”

Detective Saitta (Whitman) asking Julie (Farrow), who is *blind*, if his sister had been acting mysteriously before her death.

This is a very loud and destructive crime film. Shot in Montreal, the Quebec province of Canada, Una magnum special per Tony Saitta/Blazing Magnum stands above the usual run-of-the-mill Cinecitta’ cop productions with its international cast, splendid locations, impressive budget and expensive set-pieces. In essence, a beer n’ popcorn movie, Una magnum special per Tony Saitta is admittedly, for this reviewer, great entertainment value. Narrative may be one dimensional, and so is Whitman’s character, but Alberto de Martino’s direction and Aristide Massaccesi’s visual eye are, if not workman-like, are energetic and keen for thrills. Although Martino’s film provides more in the way of explosive action than the majority of poor boy Italian pretenders, this particular movie exists for set-pieces and exploits them to their full potential. And bloody violence is paramount as Tony Saitta blasts away the scum with his large hand cannon.

The cast, mainly cinema veterans, chew over what is an undemanding script. Whitman, in need of a haircut, shave and a change of clothes, makes a capable Eastwood bogus and Saxon is welcome charismatic support. Farrow, who later appeared in Zombi 2 (1979), Anthropophagous (1980) and L’ultimo cacciatore/The Last Hunter (1980) plays an unconvincing blind teacher but it’s the crash, bang and wallops that are the real meat in Una magnum special per Tony Saitta. In what is perhaps one of the more effective car pursuits in the history of ‘cinema delitto’, Whitman gives chase in his clapped-out banger to a suspect in a road-hugging Mustang. Clichés are welcome as both cars charge in to cardboard boxes and splash through puddles - a scene of two men carrying a large sheet of glass across a road only to be smashed by one of the cars is sadly missing. After ten minutes of motor mayhem, Montreal is left in a state of ruins as burnt rubber and dented metal litter the streets - it was as if Godzilla had come to party (and I recognise Jack Looney's during the chase, a diner that served the best delli sandwiches).   

Apart from a handful of blood squibs, the violence portrayed in the film is hardly explicit when compared to Umberto Lenzi’s cop films for example. However, one sequence where the murderer pricks a baby’s throat with a flick-knife before blasting away at Whitman in an infirmary, is startling and scandalous. It’s as if the scene was thrown in at random for shock value and reminds one of the West German drama Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street (1972) where a bullet festival takes place in an incubator ward - subtle it is not. Saying that, Martino’s scene is filmed with considerable gusto and when the prime suspect attempts to cheat justice by fleeing in a helicopter, Whitman foils the escape with a volley of shots from his Magnum. Within seconds, the helicopter has more holes in it than a colander before plummeting to the ground in flames which all goes to emphasise Whitman’s understandable explosions of anger with cathartic effect.   

With a funky, but rather inappropriate Euro disco score, Una magnum special per Tony Saitta has to be Martino’s finest 90 minutes. Shot in English, the Canadian location makes a refreshing change from the usual Roman fare. The attraction of Martino’s film may be aesthetic but it shares a common trait with most Italian cop thrillers in that they are so obviously a right-wing fantasy. The philosophy remains the same with Dirty Harry and his many imitations in that they are reactionary. College students are butchered by the murderer as police remain frustrated and unclear of his identity. As members of the class succumb to the assassin’s blade (one is pulped in a rock grinder), Whitman finally unmasks the killer. Greed is what sparks this intelligent member of society to kill and the narrative would suggest that students should know their place within the state while police keep a careful eye on them. With a dash of giallo for good measure, Una magnum special per Tony Saitta is truly wonderful nonsense that makes a great stress reliever as Whitman hands out moody wise-cracks and fat lips. You’ll love it.
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MikeMalloy

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Nice review, Jay.

While reading it, I thought you were going to ignore the giallo influence, but then you acknowledged it right there at the end. Good job.

I think this is going to lead me to start a new post...
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Jay

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Mike!

How goes it! I hope you're well, mighty sir. Well, the good news is that the book is with a new publisher and it looks like it's going ahead. Feel free to mail me directly and I'd like to thank you for your time and assistance. Always very much appreciated.

Yeah, there's a sniff of giallo in there...

Off to Berlin Film Festival tomorrow. I'll keep you in the loop.

Jay
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demented_uk

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Just found out that there was a Japanese Laserdisc release of this.  Does anyone know if there is a rip in circulation?
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paperbag

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I'll be watching this very soon but so far SPECIAL COP IN ACTION has my favourite car chase
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vigilanteforce

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that one kicks ass for sure but the one in BLAZING MAGNUM is way more extreme...
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Stephen Grimes

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but so far SPECIAL COP IN ACTION has my favourite car chase
I noticed that the chase in SPECIAL COP where the police car drives off the jetty into the water was later reused by Alfonso Brescia in his LA TUA PER MIO FIGLIO,it features an excellent car chase around Milan during the opening scenes.
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lilly

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Watched this the other day on a dvdr burn of i'm asuming a Jap laserdisc. nice widescreen print.
Thoroughly entertaining movie.
As all of you have said the car chase is nuts, but my favourite bit had to be the Tranny punch up.
did any of you notice when he threw one of the transvestites in to a wall, how they hit their head on the corner of a cabinet/bookcase type thing, it looked extremely painful  :)
I also loved how he used the curling tongs.

I thought the Giallo elements were quite obvious especially when it involved the blind girl.
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