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Author Topic: Dario Argento: The Man, the Myths and the Magic – FAB Press (Alan Jones)  (Read 4276 times)

Jonny

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Profondo Argento, now fully updated, re-named and re-issued with brand new chapters!
Limited Edition, available in hardback only!
Features full-length interviews with: Asia Argento, Claudio Argento, Fiore Argento, Lamberto Bava, Roy Bava, Simon Boswell, Michael Brandon, Chiara Caselli, Luigi Cozzi, Liam Cunningham, Keith Emerson, Franco Ferrini, Jessica Harper, Udo Kier, Daria Nicolodi, Stefania Rocca, George A. Romero, Gianni Romoli, Dardano Sacchetti, Julian Sands, Tom Savini, Claudio Simonetti, Michele Soavi, Sergio Stivaletti, Max Von Sydow, Ronnie Taylor, Luciano Tovoli.
All-new illustrations! Never-before-seen behind the scenes photos, exclusive shots specially produced for this book, rare artwork and stills.
This book features full coverage of Argento’s new film Dracula 3D.
Full details and pre-order info at the FAB Press website HERE
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Letterboxd - "Henry Silva has a small zoo at home and his weapon of choice is a bazooka"

cannibal man

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this looks like a fantastic book.
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Bogan The Wanderer

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I'll be buying this - that's a gorgeous cover - but I wonder how many of those interviews are new to this volume, or extended from the last edition.
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Zarith

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Anyone ordered it and received it?

It was supposed to ship this week.
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Zarith

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Well I got it... First impression are not that positive.

It is more a fan book than an serious exploration of Dario Argento filmography. It doesn't have the same depth as Maitland McDonagh's Broken Mirrors Broken Minds thesis or Jean-Baptiste Thoret's Dario Argento Magicien de La Peur (a personnal favorite). Alan Jones is essentially a journalist - reporting facts, trivia and adding little comments. He never really study the movie themselves, never put things in context. It's a shame.

The book has a generous amount of pictures, but most of them are not interesting. There are too many dull actor shots and not enough film captures. Nowhere can we see the astonishing photography of the early Argento films. It's frustrating. Since most films are now available in "print friendly" HD format, I cannot forgive this. I also expected a lot more locandine scans, posters, set shots, etc...

What annoys me also is the excessive amount of pictures of Asia. There are literally hundreds of them, many not even related to Dario's movies, with embarrassing comments such as "A purity of spirit and the look of love - Asia is a photographer's gift."  Alan Jones includes also many of his personal "fan pictures" giggling next to Dario and Asia. In fact, there are more pictures of Alan Jones in this book than of Jessica Harper or David Hemmings! I would expect a bit more distance and neutrality. We all can take a picture next to Dario and Asia... and who cares?

But these are just little nitpicks compared to what bothers me most: the unbalanced panorama of Argento's filmography. Why do we get so many pages about Argento's late career, that everybody consider inferior? Why does a masterpiece like Deep Red gets only 6 page in a 400 pages book? While Mother of Tears gets 20 pages? It doesn't make sense...

Concerning the text itself: it's relatively fun to read, if you can ignore stuff like this:

"The Phantom of the Opera is an absolute joy. It's a work of polished bravura. (...) The Phantom of the Opera is classic Dario Argento shimmering with blistering profundity and stark brilliance. Thoughtful, beautiful and mournful, Italian horror doesn't get much better than this."

  :-*
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Hellochas

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It doesn't sound like much cop this book. I think I'll pass.
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Longsden

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It doesn't sound like much cop this book. I think I'll pass.

Sounds like an expensive vanity project. I'll pass too

broonage

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Although I'd love an update to my first edition, it sounds like it won't be worth it.

Plus I aways take Jones' opinions on film with a pinch of salt, here's the chap who thought Amer was a masterpiece. Phantom is an interesting watch but it really is pants isn't it?!
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Dig that groove baby.

Longsden

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Although I'd love an update to my first edition, it sounds like it won't be worth it.

Plus I aways take Jones' opinions on film with a pinch of salt, here's the chap who thought Amer was a masterpiece. Phantom is an interesting watch but it really is pants isn't it?!

Didn't he announce the giallo was back at ff? ;D

Hellochas

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Although I'd love an update to my first edition, it sounds like it won't be worth it.

Plus I aways take Jones' opinions on film with a pinch of salt, here's the chap who thought Amer was a masterpiece. Phantom is an interesting watch but it really is pants isn't it?!

I rented this from the video shop — but to be honest after a bright and breazy start it started getting on my nerves — almost every shot was overly stylised. I was glad when the film finished!
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pricey

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Art of Darkness is the best Argento book. Seems to have been shadowed by the Alan Jones one. Its quite a lazy book, just recycled articles from Starburst.
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CardPlayer4

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It is more a fan book than an serious exploration of Dario Argento filmography. It doesn't have the same depth as Maitland McDonagh's Broken Mirrors Broken Minds thesis or Jean-Baptiste Thoret's Dario Argento Magicien de La Peur (a personnal favorite).

Have you read Thoret's update of his Argento book?
His take/study of Argento's post-"Sleepless" works is quite interesting.
My favorite french book is the Vivien Villani one, it has a less "student" feel, it is more easy to read than the Thoret book  but it still delivers some interesting thoughts...the last french book (from Bernard Joisten) is quite terrible,unfortunately.


But these are just little nitpicks compared to what bothers me most: the unbalanced panorama of Argento's filmography. Why do we get so many pages about Argento's late career, that everybody consider inferior? Why does a masterpiece like Deep Red gets only 6 page in a 400 pages book? While Mother of Tears gets 20 pages? It doesn't make sense...

Mostly because Jones wasn't there on the sets of Argento's old films, i guess?




Concerning the text itself: it's relatively fun to read, if you can ignore stuff like this:

"The Phantom of the Opera is an absolute joy. It's a work of polished bravura. (...) The Phantom of the Opera is classic Dario Argento shimmering with blistering profundity and stark brilliance. Thoughtful, beautiful and mournful, Italian horror doesn't get much better than this."

  :-*


he loves this, "Sleepless" and bashes "Phenomena" and "The Stendhal syndrome"...to each their own, i guess!
There is some fun read from Argento's directors of cinematography ( Ronnie Taylor, Luciano Tovoli) and the actors/actresses, at least.


Art of Darkness is the best Argento book.

Pretty good read indeed, is there an update of this book?...last film reviewed was "Sleepless", if i remember well.
Another fine book is the italian one from Fabio Maiello, "Confessioni di un maestro dell'horrror", Argento by himself, a long book/interview from "Bird with the crystal plumage" to "Mother of tears".
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Zarith

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Quote from: CardPlayer
Have you read Thoret's update of his Argento book?

No, I have the old edition. I might grab the update one day.

What I like about Thoret is that he talks about the movie themselves: the photography, the structure, the themes, the symbols, the music,... He is guiding us in Argento's fantasies, highlighting things I totally missed.

Quote from: CardPlayer
But these are just little nitpicks compared to what bothers me most: the unbalanced panorama of Argento's filmography. Why do we get so many pages about Argento's late career, that everybody consider inferior? Why does a masterpiece like Deep Red gets only 6 page in a 400 pages book? While Mother of Tears gets 20 pages? It doesn't make sense...

Mostly because Jones wasn't there on the sets of Argento's old films, i guess?

I guess. But still... What's the fun writing 5 pages about Adam Gierasch's work on Mother of Tears?! Even people who enjoyed Mother of Tears have to agree that Gierasch's scenario is crap and not worth a single sentence...

And who cares about Asia's career? If I buy a book with "Dario Argento'" written on it, I expect to read more about The Bird With The Crystal Plumage, than about Scarlet Diva, The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things, Transylvania, and all the other junk Asia as been involved in...


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